Center for Global Communications, International University of Japan

Japanese >

Soichiro TAKAGI

I analyze how information technology (IT) affects economic and social mechanisms, and drawing implications from this, am working on clarifying the direction of corporate management strategy and public policy. IT continues to evolve and creates various services and business models such as crowdsourcing, the sharing economy, blockchain, and the development and use of virtual currencies.

By identifying the dynamics of the technologies and economic mechanisms behind these new services, I clarify how enterprises should face and cope with technological innovation and how the government should deal with such challenges from a medium- to long-term perspective.

Executive Research Fellow / Professor, General Manager of the Research Division

Ph.D. (Information studies), The University of Tokyo

Research Areas

Information Economics, Technology Economics, Theory of Information Sociology, Corporate/Management Strategy, Business Models

Others

●Personal website
https://soichirotakagi.wordpress.com/

Biography

Soichiro Takagi is Professor, Executive Research Fellow, and the General Manager of the Research Division at the Center for Global Communications (GLOCOM) at the International University of Japan (IUJ). He is the director of the Blockchain Economic Research Lab at GLOCOM and also a visiting researcher at the University of Tokyo. He also served as an Asia Program Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School, and as a visiting associate professor at the University of Tokyo, etc.

His major field is information economics, focusing on the relationship between information technology and the economy. He has examined a variety of topics including offshore outsourcing, cloud computing, open data, the sharing economy, digital currencies, and blockchain. He has authored many books and articles, including “Blockchain Economics” (in Japanese), “Reweaving the Economy: How IT Affects the Country and Organizational Boundaries” (University of Tokyo Press).

He received a Ph.D. in Information Studies from the University of Tokyo.